I get asked alot of questions and the same questions keep getting asked and asked and asked. So I put together a Frequently Asked Questions  Blog on what I get asked all the time

 

Why does Scouting need more help?

We have over 30,000 young people on waiting lists due to the lack of adult volunteers. If more adults helped out this would take the burden off our current volunteers and allow more young people to experience the adventure of Scouting. More adults would mean more young people could join Scouting, Groups could be smaller or new Groups could even open. We always welcome any help from adults. Find out more.

 

How can I help with Scouting?

There are many ways in which you can give your time to help Scouting whatever your gender, age, abilities and skills. Simply let us know your availability and how you would like to help and we will match this to roles within your local area.

 

I don’t have a background in Scouting, does this matter?

No previous Scouting experience is needed. Energy and enthusiasm are the qualities we are looking for.

 

My child is in Scouting, is there anything I could do to help?

The short answer is yes. Many of our helpers and Leaders are parents of our youth Members. This is for a number of reasons including being able to see first hand how Scouting benefits young people and wanting to give something back, being able to spend more time with their child and realising that volunteering for Scouting is enjoyable and teaches them new skills. Speak to your child’s Section Leader to discuss how you might become involved.

 

I will only be able to help out on a flexible basis is this ok?

Yes. There are many different ways to help in Scouting and many of these can be adapted to suit your needs. Whether you can help out once a fortnight, month or term or just at special events or camps, there is bound to be a role you can play. Learn more.

 

Will I get paid?

Unfortunately, as a voluntary organisation we are unable to pay volunteers for the time they give to Scouting. Out of pocket expenses are paid and many Leaders are offered opportunities to take part in activities and social activities.

 

What are the benefits of helping out?

There are a number of benefits you can gain from volunteering. Spending time with your child, learning new skills and contributing to your community are just a few of the reasons why our current Leaders choose to spend some of their spare time in Scouting.

 

I don’t have a specific skill but am keen to help out, what can I do?

Everyone will have a skill, attribute or ability that they can pass on to our young people. One of the best things about volunteering however, is the chance to learn new skills you may not have been able to otherwise.

 

Do I have to wear uniform?

No. Although Scouting is a uniformed organisation, adults in Scouting do not have to wear a uniform.

 

Are there any age restrictions on helping out?

As long as you are over 18 years of age, you can help out as an adult volunteer in Scouting. There is no upper age limit for adult volunteers. If you are aged between 14-18, there is the option of becoming a Young Leader. More information about the Young Leaders’ Scheme.

 

What is the process for joining?

There is an application form to fill out which someone in your Group will be able to help you with. For some roles you will be required to meet a small group of people outside of the Group to discuss the role you wish to take on. References are also required for some roles. An enhanced Criminal Records (or equivalent in Scotland or Northern Ireland) check is carried out on all volunteers.

 

Will I be insured?

Yes. All Members are covered under our Personal Accident and Medical Expenses Policy.

 

What does my child have to take to Scouts?

This might vary from troop to troop but it is a good idea to take a bottle of water and a hat for sunny days. Any Medication such as inhaler should be left with the leader and you should check that your Leader is aware of any medical issues such as allergies and how to deal with them before you leave your child at Scouts for the first time.

A Leader will get you to fill out a Youth Member Application for your child when you come and try for the first time and that has questions about your child’s health care.

 

What else will my Son/daughter need apart from a uniform ?

Scouts spend a lot of time in the great outdoors so its sensible to get kited out for hiking, camping and adventure! But your leader will be able to advise what exactly you will need.

 

Where do I get the Scout Uniform?

Your Scout Leader may have some second hand uniforms available at the Hall but you can also purchase new ones at the Scout Outdoor Centre: online and at their retail shop in Rundle Street Adelaide.

 

Where do I put the Badges?

The Badges that your Scout is given at their investiture ceremony and the Achievement Badges are shown on theScout Association website ‘Badge placements”

 

Other badges such as activity badges will be sewn on to a badge blanket, your Leader will tell you what badge goes where when they give it to you.

Scouts have an enormous sense of pride in earning a badge so its great when a parent sits down and sews the badge on with them and reflect on their child’s achievement.

 

How much does Scouts cost?

Prices vary from Scout Group to Scout Group but generally prices are around the £30-£40 a term. The subs as they are referee to cover the registration to The Scout Association for registration and insurance. The subs also covers the cost of the hire or upkeep of the meeting place and so on.

* arrangements can be made in most circumstances for those who are suffering from financial difficulties.*

 

Does the Fee include camps, excursions or special activities?

No, special events, camps and excursions may incur an extra cost but every effort is made to make these adventures available for everyone.

 

Please speak to your Leader or Group Leader if you have financial difficulties to make arrangements so that your Scout does not miss out.

 

What it costs?

Scouting is an affordable way of providing a range of exciting and adventurous activities for your child.

 

In a 2010 survey, 75% of parents said Scouting provided the best value for money compared to other extra-curricular activities like sports and martial arts groups, youth clubs and drama or music classes.

 

Uniform

Young people wear core uniform of a coloured sweatshirt or shirt depending on the age range. They will also wear a special group scarf.

 

Uniform can either be bought from our District Scout shops. You can find details of these on other pages on our web site.

 

We don’t want young people to miss out through financial hardship. If concerns about finances may prevent your child taking part in Scouting or some activities, speak to your local leader, as some assistance may be available in confidence.

 

My child has a disability or additional need; can they join Scouts?

The Scout Association is committed to being inclusive of all young people, regardless of ability or disability and has a clear Equal Opportunities Policy. There is flexibility within Scouting and all Scout groups should make reasonable adjustments wherever possible to support the inclusion of young people with disabilities or additional needs.

 

Scouting is delivered by adult volunteers and is not a statutory provision (such as the education system, for example); however we endorse systems of supporting our volunteers with inclusion. We encourage local volunteers to meet with the parents/carers of the young person to discuss their individual needs and plan support strategies. In some locations, there are also volunteers specialising in supporting inclusion. However, despite this and the best efforts of our volunteers, there may be situations where a particular Group does not have the capacity or resources to meet the needs of a young person or make the reasonable adjustments necessary. In such instances, local volunteers can work with the parents/carers, to find an alternative Group.

 

Is Scouts a religious organisation?

The Scout Association is an inclusive and values-based Movement. Membership is open to young people and adults of all faiths and beliefs, including the absence of an affirmed faith, humanists or atheists, who share our values. Our values are integrity, respect, care, belief and cooperation. A key element of the programme is spiritual development and exploring different faiths, beliefs and attitudes. There are a range of variations of the Promise (a commitment made by all members), to account for different age ranges, faith and beliefs and nationalities (including those who are stateless).

 

My child is in Scouting, is there anything I could do to help?

The short answer is yes. Many of our helpers and Leaders are parents of our youth Members. This is for a number of reasons including being able to see first-hand how Scouting benefits young people and wanting to give something back, being able to spend more time with their child and realising that volunteering for Scouting is enjoyable and teaches them new skills. Speak to your child’s Section Leader to discuss how you might become involved.

 

I will only be able to help out on a flexible basis is this ok?

Yes. There are many different ways to help in Scouting and many of these can be adapted to suit your needs. Whether you can help out once a fortnight, month or term or just at special events or camps, there is bound to be a role you can play. Learn more.

 

I don’t feel I have any suitable skills; how can I get involved?

Parents can volunteer and help in many ways; you don’t have to be a regular Bear Grylls. You might have first aid knowledge that you could teach the group, or you might be able to teach our Scouts a thing or two about DIY.

If you’re good with accounts you could be Group treasurer, or if you’re a culinary whizz you could run cooking sessions with the young people. Everyone has a skill (whether you know it or not) and we can make use of it.

 

There’s no pressure to continue as a helper or leader afterwards, but hopefully we’ll be able to inspire you by showing how easy and rewarding it can be to volunteer with Scouts.

 

We’re moving to a new area, can I transfer my child to a new Scout Group?

If you’re moving to a new area, transferring to a new Scout Group can be great way of helping your child settle in and make friends. You should let your child’s current leader know as soon as you can that you’re planning to move. When you know where you’re moving to, you can contact the local Group directly.

You can also call the Scout Information Centre on 0845 300 1818. They will be able to put you in touch with a Group in your new area.

If you’re moving abroad, the Information Centre will be able to give you the details of the Scout organisation in that country.

 

My child is moving up a section; what do I need to do to help them prepare?

When the time comes to move up to the next age range, a young person can have mixed feelings: excitement at moving on, sadness at leaving friends behind. Making the transition as smooth as possible goes a long way to helping your child settle into their new section.

First of all you need to check what the process involves with your child’s current Section Leader as it can vary locally. You might need to put your child on a waiting list for the next section or, in some cases, it may happen automatically.

You should also ask whether the new Section Leader will be in touch or if you have to contact them first. Also be aware that meeting times and places may be different in the next section.

If your child has friends in their section that they want to move up with, make sure that the section leader knows about this so that they can help if possible. This could also be a good opportunity to arrange sharing transport to and from meetings.

 

How are leaders screened, and what safety precautions do The Scout Association have in place?

All UK Scout leaders undergo a stringent screening process. This includes The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS, formally known as the CRB), appointment panel Interview plus two personal references.